Florence Welch, 35, speaks out on motherhood as she stars in stunning Vogue shoot

Florence Welch has spoken out on the lure of motherhood, admitting that domesticity is ‘creeping up on me’.

The Florence + The Machine frontwoman is preparing for the release of the fifth album Dance Fever, promoting the upcoming record in a stunning new shoot and interview with Vogue Magazine.

The singer, 35, admitted that her work has consumed her for years but she is beginning to feel a shift in her life, musing: ‘you don’t have to date bad people to make good songs.’

Shift in life: Florence Welch has spoken out on the lure of motherhood, admitting in a new interview with Vogue that domesticity is 'creeping up on me'

Shift in life: Florence Welch has spoken out on the lure of motherhood, admitting in a new interview with Vogue that domesticity is ‘creeping up on me’

Florence, who tells Vogue she is in a relationship but is reluctant to name her partner, says that she has been feeling the pull of motherhood for the past two years, while working on her latest record.

She admits that while she feels the most confident she ever has in her creativity and work, she has become increasingly aware of the ‘rumbling panic that your time to have a family might suddenly just–’, [clicking her fingers like a magician]adding of the recording process for Dance Fever:

‘I had this drive underneath me and I was like if these songs want to get out, I have to get them out fast, because I do have other desires…’

When asked why she feels like she can’t have both motherhood and a career, Florence explains: ‘I think I’m afraid. It seems like the bravest thing in the world to have children.’

Happiness: The singer, 35, admitted that her work has consumed her but she is beginning to feel a shift in her life, musing: 'you don't have to date bad people to make good songs'

Happiness: The singer, 35, admitted that her work has consumed her but she is beginning to feel a shift in her life, musing: ‘you don’t have to date bad people to make good songs’

‘It’s the ultimate measure of faith and of letting go of control. I feel like to have a child and to let that amount of love in…I’ve spent my life trying to run away from these big feelings. I think I’ve had a stilted emotional immaturity just through having been in addiction and eating disorders for years.’

She adds that she summed up her feelings in a line in a song that didn’t make the new album – ‘the creep of domesticity it both horrifies and calls to me’.

‘Even with all my logic that my life is in so many ways probably not suited for children, it is creeping up on me despite myself. Haunting me almost,’ she explains.

Florence, who in the past has been linked to events planner James Nesbitt and Maccabee’s guitarist Felix White, spent lockdown living with her new partner in London, admitting it was a tough time for her sobriety.

Coming soon: The Florence + The Machine frontwoman is preparing for the release of the fifth album Dance Fever on May 13

Coming soon: The Florence + The Machine frontwoman is preparing for the release of the fifth album Dance Fever on May 13

After eight years of sobriety the star says: ‘I really f**cking empathize with anyone who did relapse in those two years because I think it was probably the closest I ever thought about it.’

Florence has been candid about the hard-drinking lifestyle she kept up early in her career. The Kiss With A Fist singer went on the wagon early in 2014 and released her next album How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful the following year.

Prior to getting sober Florence found herself on the verge of a breakdown after nearly four years on the road, drinking and singing.

‘I used to drink before every performance,’ she revealed to Billboard a little over a year after she decided to give up alcohol.

Back to gigs: While she worked hard on her sobriety, Florence also spent the pandemic embracing some rare time at home after years of back to back touring and recording

Back to gigs: While she worked hard on her sobriety, Florence also spent the pandemic embracing some rare time at home after years of back to back touring and recording

See the full feature in the May issue of British Vogue on sale now.  Dance Fever is released on May 13

See the full feature in the May issue of British Vogue on sale now. Dance Fever is released on May 13

‘I’m quite shy, really – that’s probably why I used to drink a lot.’

When Florence turned 27 her mother Evelyn made a speech at her birthday party and asked her daughter’s friends to make sure she did not wind up in the ’27 Club.’

The ’27 Club’ is a group of celebrities who all died at the age of 27, many of substance-related causes including Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Amy Winehouse.

Not long after that birthday she decided to sober up and eventually came to regard her drinking days with ‘with a mix of nostalgia and terror.’

While she worked hard on her sobriety, Florence also spent the pandemic embracing some rare time at home after years of back to back touring and recording.

She was forced to pause work on her latest album when the pandemic led her home from New York where she was writing with producer Jack Antonoff.

She finally found her way back into the studio in London to record the album, which she describes as ‘Lungs with more self-knowledge. I’m kind of winning at my own creation. A lot of it is questioning my commitment to loneliness; to my own sense as a tragic figure’

‘I feel like as a female artist you spend a lot of time screaming into the void for people to take you seriously, in a way that male artists just don’t have to do.’

See the full feature in the May issue of British Vogue on sale now. Dance Fever is released on May 13.

.

Leave a Comment