Sting says he doesn’t think “any grown man can be in a band”

Sting has said that he doesn’t think “any grown man can be in a band” because it’s a “teenage gang” thing.

Speaking in a new interview, the former Police frontman talked about aging out of rock music and how he struggles to find growth in music made by veteran bands.

“I don’t think any grown man can be in a band, actually,” Sting told MOJO (via Tone Deaf). “A band is a teenage gang. Who wants to be in a teenage gang when you’re knocking 70? It doesn’t allow you to evolve.”

He continued: “You have to obey the rules and the gestalt of the band. As much as I love the Stones and AC/DC, it’s hard to see growth in their music.

“For me, the band was merely a vehicle for the songs and not the other way round.”

Sting’s comments, ironically, come after he spent six years in The Police from 1977 until 1983 – when he was 26 until he was 32. He released his first solo album, ‘The Dream Of The Blue Turtles’, in 1985, which was well -received. However, if his solo release had proved unsuccessful, he explained he hopes he wouldn’t have returned to the band.

“Both Andy [Summers] and Stewart [Copeland] had made albums without me so it was my right too,” he explained. “I recruited a band from the jazz world and I was lucky it was a hit. I have no idea what would have happened if it hadn’t been a hit.”

He added: “Would I have gone back to the band and eaten humble pie? I hope not.”
Earlier this year, Sting sold his entire songwriting to Universal Music Publishing Group in a deal rumored to be worth over $250 million (£184 million).

The agreement covers all Sting’s solo songs, including the likes of ‘Shape Of My Heart’, ‘Fields Of Gold’ and ‘Englishman In New York. The deal also extends to the songs Sting wrote for The Police, such as ‘Roxanne’, ‘Every Breath You Take’ and ‘Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic’.

Meanwhile, Sting shared a powerful performance of his 1985 track ‘Russians’ in support of the Ukraine last month.

Leave a Comment